Weekly Disability Reading List

Closeup picture of a monthly calendar, focused on a single week

Links to three disability-related articles shared last week on NCCI social media. You can always visit NCCI on Facebook and Twitter at the following links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncciplattsburgh/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCCIPlatts

New content is posted every day.

Marca Bristo, Influential Advocate for the Disabled, Dies at 66
Glenn Rifkin, The New York Times - September 8, 2019

Marca Bristo was one of the true originals in Independent Living. She was the Executive Director of Access Living, the Center for Independent Living in Chicago.

Far from “helpless”: How the Disability Rights Movement saved my life
Nadina Laspina, Salon.com - September 9, 2019

One woman’s story of discovering disability rights and how it changed how she viewed her own disability,.

Open Letter to People Who Do Things
Rabbi Ruti Regan, Real Social Skills - October 5, 2015

This is an amazing essay that at first seems kind of pessimistic, but is actually profoundly encouraging, especially for people with disabilities who strive to make their mark in a public way.

What's Important To You?

Picture of a gray computer keyboard with focus on blue keys reading ONLINE SURVEY

If you have a few minutes, please let us know what’s important to you by completing our short online survey. It’s anonymous, and you don’t have to sign up for anything to complete the survey. We just want to get a detailed picture of which disability issues and services people with disabilities and others in the North Country care about most.

Thanks for your help!

Click here to visit the survey page and get started!

Weekly Disability Reading List

Closeup picture of a monthly calendar, focused on a single week

Links to three disability-related articles shared last week on NCCI social media. Don’t forget, you can always visit NCCI on Facebook and Twitter at the following links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncciplattsburgh/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCCIPlatts

New content is posted every day.

Plain Language - Self-Advocacy Info
Self Advocates Becoming Empowered - August 22, 2019

In-depth guide to writing in “plain language,” for better understanding by people with cognitive or developmental disabilities.

Big Ideas in Culture
Teal Sherer, New Mobility Magazine - September 3, 2019

An overview of three influential ideas in current disability culture.

Do All Disabled People Think The Same?
Jubilee, YouTube - September 1, 2019

A creative video showing the differences in how people with disabilities view the disability experience.

Aging In Place Housing Forum

Housing Forum Flyer 2.jpg

What:

Join area agencies to learn more about the different types of housing in our community, information about home modifications, and ways to stay in your home as you age.

When:

September 24, 2019
4 pm - 6 pm

Where:

130 Arizona Avenue
Plattsburgh, NY 12903

Speakers:

Shauna Miller — Housing Options
John Farley — Home Renovations
Heather West — Affording To Stay In Your Home

RSVP By 9/23/19 518-565-4620

Participating Agencies:

Clinton Country Office For The Aging
JCEO
North Country Center for Independence
Evergreen Townhouse Corporation
Rural Law Center of New York
NY Office For People with Developmental Disabilities

New York State NY Connects of Clinton County
800-342-9871 518-565-4620

Comment Today To Save Crucial protections under the Fair Housing Act!

Action Alert

The following Action Alert was sent by the New York Association on Independent Living (NYAIL)


On Monday August 19th, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced a proposed rule that would make it nearly impossible to use a well-established legal theory to prosecute housing discrimination cases.

Disparate impact is a longstanding legal tool to fight discrimination and ensure equal housing opportunity under the Fair Housing Act. It requires banks, landlords, and other housing providers to choose policies that apply fairly to all people. Some policies that seem neutral in theory can unfairly exclude certain groups of people or segregate particular communities in practice. This protection allows Fair Housing attorneys to identify and prevent harmful, inequitable, and unjustified policies, thereby ensuring that everyone can be treated fairly.

The disparate impact tool helps make housing accessible for people with disabilities, as well as families with children, women, LGBTQ people, people of faith, and communities of color. It has played a critical role in advancing civil rights and equal opportunity and addressing the segregation that still persists in America. Disparate impact is used to address disparities in rental practices, lending, property insurance, zoning, and other areas. But its impact extends far beyond housing.

The National Fair Housing Alliance and many other civil rights organizations have come together in an organized effort to save disparate impact and beat back this assault on our civil rights.

Action: Visit the website www.defendcivilrights.org to learn about the issue and leave an official comment for HUD during the 60-day public comment period, ending October 18th. In your testimony you can point out how this will strip away this crucial protection for people with disabilities.

Click the link below to log in and send your message:
https://www.votervoice.net/BroadcastLinks/S8Hk095u7PCwsAz35KuM6w

Weekly Disability Reading List

Closeup picture of a monthly calendar, focused on a single week

Links to three disability-related articles shared last week on NCCI social media. Don’t forget, you can always visit NCCI on Facebook and Twitter at the following links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncciplattsburgh/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCCIPlatts

New content is posted every day.

We Need More Wheelchair Users to Become Architects
Niall Patrick Walsh, ArchDaily - August 16, 2019

A look at how some prominent architects with disabilities have influenced the push for wheelchair accessibility and universal design.

Confessions of a Motivational Speaker
Gary Karp, New Mobility Magazine - August 1, 2019

An honest, critical look at the business and practices of motivational speaking by people with disabilities, focusing on the conflicts between what audiences want to hear, and what the disability community needs audiences to understand,

Pardon Me: Helpful, But Unhelpful
Rooted In Rights, YouTube - August 27, 2019

Advice on the best and worst ways to offer assistance to a person with a disability.

Weekly Disability Reading List

Closeup picture of a monthly calendar, focused on a single week

Links to disability-related articles shared last week on NCCI social media. Don’t forget, you can always visit NCCI on Facebook and Twitter at the following links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncciplattsburgh/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCCIPlatts

New content is posted every day.

What Different-Looking People Would Like You to Know Before You Stare
David Pogue, The New York Times - August 13, 2019

There’s nothing too surprising here, but it’s good to see it all so well documented and explained.

A girl in a wheelchair spots a model in a wheelchair: The story behind the viral photo
Ellen Seidman, Love That Max - August 19, 2019

Viral photos and videos featuring people with disabilities often have questionable histories and debatable effects. This one really seems to be as amazing as it seems.

Guest Bloggers for the NCCI Website

For a little over a year we have been posting up to two articles per month, written by people with disabilities, on our website. Here is a link where you can read all of the guest pieces so far.

If you know someone with a disability locally who might be interested in writing for our website, please send them this link: https://www.ncci-online.com/ncciblog/2019/7/22/share-your-stories

The Unpredictability of Chronic Illness

By Allison Jonergin

Having fluctuating symptoms means I might work for a few hours but use the drive-thru at the pharmacy on the way home.

It means I may walk into a grocery store feeling okay but walk out feeling desperate for a rest. I sometimes park in the furthest parking space so I can stretch my stiff legs, and I sometimes park in the handicapped spot.

It means I get irritated easily when my pain feels out of control, but may seem fine on the outside.

Picture of a 3-d stick figure holding a giant pen, with title “Goest Blogger”

Given that, my decision-making is typically geared toward lessening pain and conserving energy.

What does that look like? It looks like going to bed early and sleeping in. It looks like microwaved meals and a messy home. It looks like my dog’s brown eyes staring up at me, hoping today is the day she gets a walk. It looks like turning down an invitation because there isn’t enough time in my schedule to recover from the event afterward. It looks like I live in my bed.

So I’m protective, I’m stubborn, I’m sometimes hostile when faced with doing something I know will pique my pain and take days to recover from. I just want to live in this sacred space where my symptoms are a part of my life but don’t rule it.

There are times when I don’t want to treat my body lovingly. I avoid resting during the day. I eat the foods that trigger aggressive symptoms. I delay doing the exercises that help in the long run. Why? I get tired. I get tired of living a life dictated by health issues. I get tired of being responsible with my body. I lash out in anger at it for trapping me in a cycle of pain and exhaustion. I decide a burst of freedom is worth the onslaught of symptoms I’ll suffer later.

I’m usually wrong.

I’ve learned it’s better to live a life in which I employ my preventative measures steadily and with persistence. The only way to win the battle is to fight in the first place.

Click here if you would like to contribute a blog post for the NCCI website.

Weekly Disability Reading List

Closeup picture of a monthly calendar, focused on a single week

Links to disability-related items shared last week on NCCI social media. Don’t forget, you can always visit NCCI on Facebook and Twitter at the following links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncciplattsburgh/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCCIPlatts

New content is posted every day.

This week we explored disabled people making videos on YouTube:

Please also note that we continue to update and share publicity for the Winz N’ Pinz bowling fundraiser. If you are on Facebook, please share the Facebook announcement too, and encourage others to d the same. Every time someone shares the announcement on Facebook we will reserve a 50/50 ticket for them. It’s just a little incentive to get the word out!

Wheelchair Running

By Amber Morgan

Hello, my name is Amber Morgan. My pronouns are she/her/hers. I am a disabled person. I have Cerebral Palsy. I am also a trans person. I am a trans woman. I am also a local athlete. I am a runner. I race in a wheelchair alongside other wheelchair racers and runners on foot. I have also been an activist locally and on the state level for the LGBTQ community, the mental health community, and my disabled community.

What I want to mention in this blog post is my work being a disabled athlete here in the North Country. I started my running journey 3 years ago.

I was really struggling with my depression and where I fit in. A friend talked to me because they really noticed this and felt very uncomfortable with seeing the path I was taking.

Picture of a 3-d stick figure holding a giant pen, with title “Goest Blogger”

We talked and my friend suggested I get involved in sports, especially running. So I started. I only had a hospital style wheelchair not built for running or going quickly. I trained for a bit but I wasn’t consistent. So with some encouragement from other friends I decided I was going to sign up for my first race … the Burlington Color Run. I did that race which was a lot of fun. It was fun because you get powdered paint thrown at you at paint stations you run through.

That next year I signed up and ran 12 races having the same wheelchair. I knew I needed a new, better, more fitting chair that would enable me to run faster and easier. I worked with a few friends to get the wheelchair and got it this past June. That June I signed up for my first major race and 5k. I signed up for the Friehofer’s Run for Women in Albany.

This is a 5k where there is everyone from around the world elite runners down to runners like me just the casual runner. I finished that race and earned myself a personal best time by twenty minutes.

Why am I sharing this? Well simple. This race is my hardest race to date. The first mile and a half was all uphill. It was a challenge … a huge challenge way over my head. I took that challenge on.

Living a disabled life we have challenges.

We have obstacles or things we have to overcome. Life isn’t easy but at the end of the day we need to keep pushing. Keep fighting. Push on through those obstacles so that when we cross our own finish lines just not in a race we can be happy. We can rest our head on our pillow at night in bed knowing that we pushed our limits to test. We can show people that despite our disabilities we can do amazing things.

Click here if you would like to contribute a blog post for the NCCI website.